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Sustainable Investment and Policy Trends for 2009

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 

In a recent article for Sustainable Industries, green industry analyst Neal Dikeman made some predictions for the cleantech sector in '09 in spite of the credit crunch and capital market meltdown. The article is worth a read, and here are some highlights:

 

  • Lower oil prices will harm the EV/PHEV and biofuels sectors significantly
  • He's bullish on thin film solar potential
  • Large players in the energy sector will swoop up mid-sized solar players
  • Nuclear may gain a strong footing as a comprimise for low carbon energy creation
  • Green building hype will peter out

 

It's not all doom and gloom, but is a relatively realistic, informed look. Take a look and post your thoughts.

post #2 of 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deej:

 

  • Lower oil prices will harm the EV/PHEV and biofuels sectors significantly
  • He's bullish on thin film solar potential
  • Large players in the energy sector will swoop up mid-sized solar players
  • Nuclear may gain a strong footing as a comprimise for low carbon energy creation
  • Green building hype will peter out


 

I don't agree with the first bullet because I think the price of oil will rebound fairly rapidly.

 

I do agree on the second bullet.  Don't know enough about the 3rd bullet to comment.

 

I disagree with the fourth bullet due to the high cost of nuclear energy.

 

I disagree with the fifth bullet because energy efficiency (a major component of green building) is the cheapest way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and also saves money on energy costs.

 

I don't think he and I see eye to eye :-)

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