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How big (or small) was the carbon footprint of your Thanksgiving dinner?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

While we talked about people's plans for the holiday, now we can talk about what actually happened.  This morning on NPR Morning Edition they had a little segment on the average carbon "wingprint" of your Thanksgiving meal. 

 

Most likely your turkey traveled by truck to get to your grocer. That trip probably started in a state like Minnesota or North Carolina, which are leading turkey producers. The cranberries are most likely from Wisconsin or Massachusetts, two states that produce more than 80 percent of the nation's cranberries. But the National Resources Defense Council suggests that many ingredients for Thanksgiving dinner can be found at local farmers markets.

 

Now that Thanksgiving is coming to a close, did anyone out there use local ingredients in their meal?

post #2 of 3

Well my in-laws made all the food so I have no idea, but I'm guessing there wasn't much local food in there.  A ginormous turkey, stuffing/dressing, cranberry sauce, yams, mashed potatoes, apple cider/german wine, crescent rolls, etc.  I'm guessing pretty much all of that food travelled quite a distance, unfortunately.  But it was damn tasty!

post #3 of 3

Yeah, I'm not sure how local my Thanksgiving was.  But at least no person had to fly to be at the table!

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Green Options › Forums › Sustainable Living Discussions › Healthy Food & Beverage › How big (or small) was the carbon footprint of your Thanksgiving dinner?