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Speed bumps increase greenhouse gas emissions!

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

From AutoBlogGreen (Jan. 28, 2008):

 

"We've all encountered speed bumps and odds are most of us hate them, especially the really enormous unpainted ones that tear holes in your oil pan in poorly lit parking lots. Well now we have another reason to despise speed bumps. They increase fuel consumption and emissions. A lot! In a study conducted the Millbrook Proving Ground in England, researchers found that their test car achieved 48 mpg (U.S.) when running at a steady 30mph. When the same car was forced to negotiate speed bumps with the constant braking and acceleration, the mileage dropped to under 26mpg with a corresponding increase in CO2 emissions. The results corroborate a previous study by the Transport Research Laboratory which found an 82 percent increase in CO emissions and 37 percent jump in NOx emissions on roads with speed bumps."

post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by stins:

When the same car was forced to negotiate speed bumps with the constant braking and acceleration, the mileage dropped to under 26mpg with a corresponding increase in CO2 emissions. The results corroborate a previous study by the Transport Research Laboratory which found an 82 percent increase in CO emissions and 37 percent jump in NOx emissions on roads with speed bumps."

 

That certainly makes sense because people tend to decelerate and then accelerate again due to speed bumps (personally I just drive slow in residential neighborhoods).  But of course you can't just remove speed bumps, for safety reasons.

 

The solution is that people should drive like me!  Just keep your speed down in residential areas.  What's the hurry?  Same thing with people who accelerate to stop signs and traffic lights.  There's absolutely no point - you just get there a few seconds earlier to sit and wait for the light to turn green.  Or the people who accelerate to pass you just so they can get 1 car length ahead. 

 

Not only are they creating unnecessary emissions, but they're wasting gas too.  You would think people would go easy on the gas just for economic reasons, even if they don't care about the environment.  Maybe next to the gas gauge we need an instantaneous money wasted gauge.

post #3 of 4

It seems to be a pretty normal pattern in terms of car safety vs. car efficiency.  I have noticed that in so many different aspects of the whole arguement.  I like to hope that eventually we will get closer to having both, but that seems so far away.  The post is pretty interesting, I've seen speed bump neighborhoods before, but not one that excessive as in the photo.  Those look like you'd almost have to stop to go over them.  The ones in our neighborhoods are more shallow and a few feet long so that if you're going the speed limit (25-30) you shouldn't have to slow down hardly at all, but they certainly wake you up if you're going 40-50mph.  I would be interested to see a study that tests different designs and distances to see which are most effective in terms of safety and efficiency.

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by srj0385:

It seems to be a pretty normal pattern in terms of car safety vs. car efficiency. 


 

Well that's a good point too.  Often I see people comment that their car in the '80s got better fuel efficiency than most of today's cars.  The reason is that cars now have a lot more safety features, which makes them heavier and less fuel efficient.  Basically the gains we've gotten in fuel efficiency due to technology have been offset by losses due to increased weight from safety features.

 

We're not going to backtrack and get rid of the safety features in favor of fuel efficiency improvements, so you need another solution, like shifting toward a cleaner technology (electric cars).

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