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Charging the EV

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
From The Good Human -  

Regarding environmental impact, charging up your car with electricity from the grid also wins handily over filling up at the gas station
. In the most comprehensive PHEV study to date, released in 2007 by EPRI and the non-profit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), results predict that all greenhouse gases will be reduced as PHEVs begin to penetrate the car market. Estimated cumulative greenhouse gas reductions from 2010 to 2050, depending upon how fast PHEVs take hold, range from 3.4 to 10.3 billion tons.

More than one half of our national energy grid is powered by coal, and in areas where PHEVs are charged through coal-provided electricity, says NRDC, there is the possibility of increased levels of soot and mercury emissions. However, charging up can be much less of a guilt-ridden affair where cleaner electrical sources like wind and solar are available. The website HybridCars.com points out that as more power plants are required to develop green power and emit fewer greenhouse gases, the environmental and health benefits will further increase.

Got them beat already! İ have zero feelings of guilt! We just don't drive when we don't have too.
Far better to keep the pollution at one point where it can be cleaned up than in a million exhaust pipes! At the power plant cleanup is much more practical.


 

post #2 of 7
 My EV has  been terrific lowering my carbon footprint -my City-EL would seem to take forever to charge, so this winter I just put it away and rode my human powered velomobile.  Maybe next spring I will pull my EV out of hibernation, but not having that vehicle available has sure cut down my driving!
post #3 of 7
I've got that study.  Used to reference it all the time.  Here it is if you want to check it out.
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the study Dana!

İt is always easier, cheaper, more effective and more practical to treat a large gas stream than 50,000 small streams - meaning one power plant or 50,000 cars. Heat recovery is used extensively at the power plant whereas it is not easy or cheap to do in a car. 

The control over burning in the power plant is good - to them it is big money if they waste fuel. İn an auto a small percentage is usually not noticed. Specific fuel consumption is one number that should be on the plant managers desk every morning - along with the explanation of any problem plus the solution if necessary.
post #5 of 7
I totally agree with that electric vehicles, I just saw the new Volt from the CES Show and it rocks!  I also read that some vehicle shops are doing complete conversions on about 2 vehicles.  Basically I read that they will drop the regular engine and put in an electric motor and batteries.  I think I would do this if I has like a big SUV or a really nice  instead of buying entirely new car.
Also those companies are converting toyota prius and ford escape. 
post #6 of 7
Anyone can go on the US EPA website and determine the lbs/kw of GHG emissions in there area. I cannot remember the exact site, but I did something similar for an ad at our former EV dealer. This is all from my memory (so don't hold me to it): In Arkansas it is around 1.3 lbs of CO2/kw. Doing the math, to go 40 miles in an EV would take 7kw =9.1 lbs of CO2. If your gas car gets 20 m/g at 19 lbs of CO2/gallon, it would take 38 lbs of CO2. So there is more than a 75% reduction in CO2 emissions.

Just food for thought.

I'll probably be back on my electric scooter in a few weeks. My rule is that it has to be above 40F when I leave in the morning, and not raining of course. I miss my scooter, no trips to the gas station, and no warming the engine or scraping the windshield!
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by srj0385 View Post

Anyone can go on the US EPA website and determine the lbs/kw of GHG emissions in there area. I cannot remember the exact site, but I did something similar for an ad at our former EV dealer. 

 


Here's the site.  I've also got it linked in the Carbon Footprint Calculations wiki.

Quote:
I'll probably be back on my electric scooter in a few weeks. My rule is that it has to be above 40F when I leave in the morning, and not raining of course. I miss my scooter, no trips to the gas station, and no warming the engine or scraping the windshield!

I rode mine to work in the rain today.  Not a whole lot of fun, but I brought a change of clothes, so it worked out okay.  Under 40°F is definitely pushing it!
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