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Thread Starter 

OUR BLUE PLANET

We live on a blue planet.

Seventy per cent of the earth's surface is covered by
water.
But only three per cent of all the water on earth is fresh.

Much of it is trapped in ice and glaciers, leaving only a
fraction - one per cent - for human use.
Of that, agriculture and industry use the lion's share.

Water isn't limitless. It's continuously recycled... from
oceans and the land surface... into the atmosphere as
evaporation... dropped on the land as precipitation, and

taken back to the sea by rivers and groundwater.

We don't have any more water on Earth today than we did

millions of years ago. But now, that same water has to
support six-and-a half billion people.
We might be able to survive without oil, but no one can

survive without water.
Water is the ultimate non-renewable resource: what we
have is all we get.

Yet water is at risk from climate change, pollution, over-
consumption and mismanagement.
More than one billion people lack access to clean water.

Water-related disease and illness are the leading causes of
death in the world. Two billion people live in severely
water-stressed regions.

Phase 1
$50 million over 10 years
Phase one is a pledge of $50 million to fund charitable

programs that are dedicated to two areas.

Every drop of water that flows from your faucet is a
product of the watershed you live in, or one that's close
by.

A watershed is an area of land from which water,
sediments, nutrients and contaminants, drain into a
stream, river or lake.

spread. One of the best ways to protect a local water
source is to protect the entire watershed.

 

RBC Blue Water Project
Access to safe drinking water
RBC's other focus area is access to safe drinking water.

This isn't just an issue in far-off lands, but at home too. For
health reasons, everyone needs safe drinking water.
But there are also environmental and financial reasons to

protect and conserve water.
Governments spend billions of dollars to make sure water
is safe for drinking. In many cities, the major use of

system. That not only means higher costs, but more
greenhouse gas emissions too.

We can ensure a safe water supply for the future by

10 ways you can help:-
Here are some ways you can help.

Know your water source
Get informed. Learn about your local watershed.
Find out where your drinking water comes from, and how

it's tested, treated and protected.

Keep chemicals out of the system
Don't dump products that contain toxic chemicals or
pharmaceuticals down the toilet, on the ground, or into

sewers.

Keep oil out of sewers
When you're washing your car, make sure that soaps, dirt
and oil don't enter storm sewers.

Use organics
Use organic gardening and lawn care products.
 

Use sand
Use sand rather than road salt to de-ice in wintertime.
 

Pick up after your pet
Pick up after your pet.
 

Conserve water
Conserve water. Take shorter showers. Don't let taps and
hoses run. Consider water-saving toilets, clothes washers

and showerheads.
 
 

Use tap water
Use tap water instead of buying bottled water.
 

One person can make a difference.
When it comes to water stewardship, there's a role for
everyone to play... individuals, governments, community

organizations... and companies like RBC.
 
 

The RBC Blue Water Project.
$50 million
over 10 years

This is RBC's first phase: 50 million dollars in grants over
10 years, with more activities to come.
 

Because today and tomorrow, we all need clean, fresh
water. For our future and our planet. Our blue planet.
 

For RBC Blue Water Project grant guidelines and
more information about water stewardship, visit
www.rbc.com/bluewater

Produced with the assistance of

Conservation Ontario

United States Environmental Protection Agency

The Weather Channel

RBC Corporate Communications

© Royal Bank of Canada 2008

 

Use sand
Use sand rather than road salt to de-ice in wintertime.

Pick up after your pet
Pick up after your pet.

Conserve water
Conserve water. Take shorter showers. Don't let taps and
hoses run. Consider water-saving toilets, clothes washers

Use tap water
Use tap water instead of buying bottled water.

One person can make a difference.
When it comes to water stewardship, there's a role for
everyone to play... individuals, governments, community

organizations... and companies like RBC.
 

The RBC Blue Water Project.
$50 million
over 10 years

This is RBC's first phase: 50 million dollars in grants over
10 years, with more activities to come.
 

Because today and tomorrow, we all need clean, fresh
water. For our future and our planet. Our blue planet.
 

For RBC Blue Water Project grant guidelines and
more information about water stewardship, visit
www.rbc.com/bluewater

Produced with the assistance of

Conservation Ontario

United States Environmental Protection Agency

The Weather Channel

RBC Corporate Communications

© Royal Bank of Canada 2008

 

This is RBC's first phase: 50 million dollars in grants over
10 years, with more activities to come.

Because today and tomorrow, we all need clean, fresh
water. For our future and our planet. Our blue planet.

For RBC Blue Water Project grant guidelines and
more information about water stewardship, visit
www.rbc.com/bluewater