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Tropical cyclones and global warming

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Thread Starter 

I've given up putting stuff like this on Yahoo.  Anyway, real article is in GRL, but citing them is useless since AGU doesn't have open access.  For those of you with academic IP addresses, your institution might have a subscription so you can see the article in it's original format.  Otherwise, here is a summary:

 

R&D Mag Tropical Cyclone Article

 

Oh yeah, I forgot to add that this is a great example of how while the basic physics is fairly well understood, the nonlinearities, feedbacks, and couplings in the system are far well less known, and of the ones that are being discovered, they are all positive feedbacks or couplings driving further warming. 

post #2 of 2

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by gcnp58 View Post

 

Oh yeah, I forgot to add that this is a great example of how while the basic physics is fairly well understood, the nonlinearities, feedbacks, and couplings in the system are far well less known, and of the ones that are being discovered, they are all positive feedbacks or couplings driving further warming. 



 

That does seem to be the case.  It's just because of the conspiracy among climate scientists though!  Sorry, had to interject a little Yahoo denier gibberish.  From the article:

 

Quote:

 "Since water vapor is an important greenhouse gas, an increase of water vapor in the stratosphere would warm the Earth's surface," says David M. Romps, a research associate in Harvard's Department of Earth and Planetary Science. "Our finding that tropical cyclones are responsible for many of the clouds in the stratosphere opens up the possibility that these storms could affect global climate, in addition to the oft-mentioned possibility of climate change affecting the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones."

Romps and co-author Zhiming Kuang, assistant professor of climate science in Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences, were intrigued by earlier data suggesting that the amount of water vapor in the stratosphere has grown by roughly 50 percent over the past 50 years. Scientists are currently unsure why this increase has occurred; the Harvard researchers sought to examine the possibility that tropical cyclones might have contributed by sending a large fraction of their clouds into the stratosphere.
 

 

Wow I didn't realize stratospheric water vapor had increased so much.  But yes, this appears to be yet another example of an unexpected positive feedback.

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