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Household products come clean on ingredients says WSJ

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Interesting article today in the Wall Street Journal about cleaning products and the stuff companies use to make them:

 

Quote:

You can read a label to find out what's in your food. And a quick look inside a collar or hem tells you what your clothes are made of. Now, the same is happening with the stuff you use to clean your kitchen and bathroom.

 

A few manufacturers of household cleaning products have begun disclosing the chemicals in some of their products. S.C. Johnson & Son Inc. last month rolled out Web site WhatsInsideSCJohnson.com to describe most of the ingredients for its Windex, Glade, and Shout brands. Clorox Co. lists ingredients for its Formula 409 and other products at TheCloroxCompany.com.

 

Seventh Generation Inc., which has long disclosed most of the ingredients for its eco-friendly cleaning products, last year started explaining chemical names in terms that consumers can better understand on its labels. And Procter & Gamble Co. plans to list its ingredients online and describe them in consumer friendly terms.

 

Later in the article, they mention Method and Seventh Gen again:

 

Quote:

Lydia Chen Shah, a 29-year-old marketing communications manager in Glendora, Calif., says she has gravitated to cleaners that are marketed as green, such as products by Seventh Generation and Method. "I don't want to feel like as soon as I put some household cleaner on the surface I'm going to have to stay away from it for a while," says Ms. Shah, who has pets and says she worries about their safety.

post #2 of 6

Very interesting...

 

The WhatsInsideSCJohnson.com website makes me laugh a little.  Ok, sure, nice gesture to make a website dedicated to letting people know what's in your products.  But.  But.  But.......

 

If you're looking to see what's in Shout wipes, isn't this a little too vague? (the stuff in the parentheticals is what you get when you mouse over)

 

  • Water
  • Cloth
  • Cleaning Agent (Cleaning Agent:A blend of anionic and noionic cleaning agents that removes soils.)  
  • Preservative (Preservative:Protects a product against microbial growth, to maintain performance.)
  • pH Balancer (pH Balancer:Added to change the pH of a final product to improve cleaning.)

I suppose there's some proprietary stuff/secret recipes they're looking to protect.  But that information seems to do very little good if you're aiming to judge a product's safety based on it's ingredients.

post #3 of 6


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nightmancometh View Post

 

Interesting article today in the Wall Street Journal about cleaning products and the stuff companies use to make them:

 

 

Later in the article, they mention Method and Seventh Gen again:

 

Interesting comparison.  You actually CAN'T tell what's in your food from looking at the label.  What, exactly, is in those "natural/artificial" flavors?  A lot of chemicals that don't have to be listed on the label!
 

post #4 of 6

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by captaint View Post

 

Interesting comparison.  You actually CAN'T tell what's in your food from looking at the label.  What, exactly, is in those "natural/artificial" flavors?  A lot of chemicals that don't have to be listed on the label!
 

 

Haha, yeah, that's true.  Those artificial/natural flavors are kind of like "fragrance" in personal care products...what exactly does that mean?

post #5 of 6

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by stins View Post

 

 

Haha, yeah, that's true.  Those artificial/natural flavors are kind of like "fragrance" in personal care products...what exactly does that mean?



 

Well, I COULD tell you, as I work in the fragrance/flavor industry, but I am contractually obligated not to tell trade secrets.  Suffice it to say many flavors and fragrances, whether natural or artificial, are made of MANY chemicals.

post #6 of 6
It is no wonder no one knows what is in chemical cleaners as they do not put it on the label.  Look up the MSDS(Material Safety Data Sheet) info if you really want to know, every product is required to have one available.  Most common household cleaning chemicals are toxic to ourselves and our environment.  Even 7th gen products use "chemicals".  There are alternatives out there.  I was fortunate to find a whole line of products that are enzyme based and use no toxins.  My mother has COPD and I use to have to clean for her as she could not even be in the house due to the fumes - little did I know the bottles of chemical cleaners also "offgas" while sitting under the sink or where ever you keep them turning your house into a toxic bubble!
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