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Windpower leaping up all over Illlinois!

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Wow!  As I drive the country roads of Illinois at night, I am seeing many many airplane warning lights on many many windgenerators!  Keep it up!

post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 

It is amazing!  I now see the giant Red lights from all over my area!  I can't hardly believe how energy production is changing in Central Illinois so fast  It is great!

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

Wow!  I will get some pictures in the next couple of weeks!  I just drove by the area I see nightly in the distance.  The gigantic turbines just go on and on!  There are turbines in every manner of completion some done, some half done, and some just started!  There is machinery and torn up roads everywhere!  I just found out that one of the farmer's that has turbines on his property get 10,000 per year for each turbine on his property!  Nice retirement plan!  Hey...can I have some free power too!!!!!

post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

Well, I apologize for taking so long to post some pictures.  I will get a better camera and take better photos but I figured my cellphone could at least get this started.  I counted over 40 windmills in this project which stretches from Hopedale, Illinois all the way over to Union, Illinois and beyond.  My grandfather would hardly believe the view we now have!  I'm all for it!  The more Renewable energy sources the better!  I have solar now at my house and would like to add at least a 1.5 KWH wind generator to supplement my production, especially on cloudy days.  Here are the pictures I've taken so far.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

New photos of the windmills!

post #6 of 18

Hi saintjerome,

 

Good photos - can see it all nicely!

 

It would be interesting to know the rated capacity and manufacturer of the turbines in the photos if possible.

 

What brand of turbine are you considering? I am only an interested party not a salesman.

 

Having grown up on a farm I am aware that farm yields often times are kind of like fish stories - for the area involved, the 10,000 USD per turbine per year is fantastically better than the farmer has ever made with the crops.  

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Wow,

     You are in Turkey??  I'm not sure what brand I will go with right now.  I will probably go with whatever Bauer Power is installing at the time.  I am very happy with their installation of my solar array.

 

saintjerome

post #8 of 18

Nice photos.  It's always good to see more renewable energy projects get built.

post #9 of 18

Hi saintjerome, Yes I am in Turkey. Grew up in central Oregon and later had a home in North Carolina for many years. The past 30 years I have been mostly outside the US - first working on projects and now retired. Love the place, life style and people

 

I looked at the Bauer site and they seem to use Skystream which has a quality web site. Many sites misrepresent (or at least don't present correctly) what their turbines are capable of. Skystream is free of that kind of junk. No fancy words but looks like good equipment properly represented.

 

In buying equipment for the iron ore processing plants I designed and constructed I became used to looking into suppliers claims with a jaundiced eye - too often the promises were more than could be supplied. That includes suppliers from all over the world. When you push the start button the supplier isn't usually standing beside you. 

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 

Russ, thanks for your advice.  In Central Illinois we have very few solar and wind contractors.  Bauer Power just expanded from Michigan into our area and I was impressed by their previous projects.  After talking with them at length, I went with them for my solar power.  So far...so good...I am very pleased with the results.

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

Here are some slightly better photos of the Wind Farm taken with a new blackberry storm.  I'll get some more in the future with a real cwamera.

post #12 of 18

That's very cool, saintjerome! I drove past a wind farm in the Bay Area the other day called Atamont Pass. I don't know much about it, but it seems like the turbines are pretty old and defunct which is a shame.

post #13 of 18

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deej View Post

That's very cool, saintjerome! I drove past a wind farm in the Bay Area the other day called Atamont Pass. I don't know much about it, but it seems like the turbines are pretty old and defunct which is a shame.


Really?  I went past a wind farm on the train on the way to Richmond - I think it was Altamont - and all of the turbines were spinning.  It was an impressive sight to see all those hundreds of turbines all going at once.  The farm is over 30 years old now though.  Apparently it was one of the first in the USA.

post #14 of 18

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dana1981 View Post

 


Really?  I went past a wind farm on the train on the way to Richmond - I think it was Altamont - and all of the turbines were spinning.  It was an impressive sight to see all those hundreds of turbines all going at once.  The farm is over 30 years old now though.  Apparently it was one of the first in the USA.


Altamont Pass Wind Farm is indeed one of the first US wind farms.  But that also means that a lot of those original wind turbines are rather old technologies.  This is what Wikipedia says about it:

 

Quote:

The Altamont Pass Wind Farm is one of the earliest wind farms in the United States. The wind farm is composed of over 4900 relatively small wind turbines of various types, making it at one time the largest farm in the world in terms of capacity. Altamont Pass is still the largest concentration of wind turbines in the world, with a capacity of 576 megawatts (MW), producing about 125 MW on average and 1.1 terawatt-hours (TWh) yearly.[1] They were installed after the 1970s energy crisis in response to favorable tax policies for investors.

 

Considered largely obsolete, these numerous small turbines are being gradually replaced with much larger and more cost-effective units. The small turbines are dangerous to various raptors that hunt California Ground Squirrels in the area. 1300 raptors are killed annually. Among them are 70 golden eagles that are federally protected. In total, 4700 birds are killed annually.[2] The larger units turn more slowly and, being elevated higher, are less hazardous to the local wildlife.

Deej, maybe it was the smaller turbines that caught your eye?

post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 

Here's yet another photo that I took on Monday.wind

post #16 of 18

I wonder if this is the same wind farm I could see for many miles while driving through Illinois on the way home from a business trip. I was amazed at the number of wind generators.

 

Good stuff! 

post #17 of 18
Thread Starter 

AE Guy, this farm runs down I 155 from Peoria to Lincoln, IL and also down Rte 136 near Hopedale, IL.

post #18 of 18

Looks pretty cool and at least the landscape is suitable to wind generation (massive open expanse of nothing). 

 

In the UK a big off-shore wind farm called the London Array (out in the Thames Estuary) will be built over the next few years with phase 1 (630MW) planned to be on-line by 2012. Phase 2 will make it the worlds first 1GW off-shore wind farm.

 

 

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